Bioethics Blogs

Will Ariadne Lead Us Through the Maze of End-of-Life Healthcare?

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by Richard Koo, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2011) and Adjunct Faculty

About four years ago, Susan D. Block, M.D. posted a blog on Harvard Business Review’s website as part of a series of writings focusing on innovation in health care. In her blog, she bemoaned the “lousy job” doctors do in communicating with patients when it becomes apparent that additional treatment and technology will fail to stave off death. Among several other proposals, she suggested that standards for appropriate documentation of end of life discussions should be developed, promulgated, and used as reportable indicators of quality care. To carry out that innovation, she proposed that “all electronic medical record systems would be expected to support documentation of the patient’s health care proxy, values and goals” and “a broadly-agreed-upon definition of populations for whom these discussions and documentation are appropriate would be developed.”

Dr. Block is no stranger to the subject of end of life communications between doctors and patients. She participated in a number of panels and has authored articles on the subject since the 1990s. She also did not wait for the medical profession to follow through on her proposals. As Director of the Serious Illness Program at Ariadne Labs, Dr. Block spearheaded the development of a system (the “System”) to assure that doctors caring for seriously ill patients can develop competency in communicating with their patients so that the patients “can live with their serious illness and into the last stage of life with dignity, control and a sense of peace.” The System aims to train physicians in identifying appropriate patients for such communication, determining the right time to initiate the serious illness conversation, engaging in serious illness planning, helping patients discuss their end-of life preferences with their families, and documenting those plans and preferences in the patient’s electronic health record.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.