Bioethics Blogs

Building A Quality Of Life National Movement: Igniting Advocacy To Integrate Palliative Care In Our US Health System

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series on palliative care, health policy, and health reform. The series features essays adapted from and drawing on a recent volume, Meeting the Needs of Older Adults with Serious Illness: Challenges and Opportunities in the Age of Health Care Reform, in which clinicians, researchers and policy leaders address 16 key areas where real-world policy options to improve access to quality palliative care could have a substantial role in improving value.

As our health system faces dramatically rising numbers of people living longer with complex chronic conditions, we have an unprecedented opportunity to mobilize a “quality-of-life” movement promoting patients’ choices and priorities about how they want to live at all stages of illness. Most of the current public policies and discourse about quality of life in health care focuses on the end of life. That tradition may actually impede delivery of person-centered and goal-directed quality care from the onset of illness. It also falls short in supporting shared decision-making, which requires early and continuing identification of what is most important to seriously ill patients and their families, and what they are hoping for as they progress along the continuum of care.

All people want to live healthy and disease-free lives for as long as possible. When serious illness does strike, patients and families want to achieve, cure, or keep disease progression in check. In addition, they place a high premium on maintaining good functioning and quality of life for as long as possible so they can continue to pursue life goals and enjoy what matters most to them.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.