Bioethics Blogs

The Man Who Mistook His Life For A Hat

by Jacob Dahlke, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2012)

Our society tends to put on pedestals the celebrities among us, particular upon their deaths. For author Oliver Sacks, it is no different except that he is not yet dead. He did, however, recently announce in the New York Times that metastasized tumors were found in his body. His diagnosis is terminal in the near future. There is an ease and confidence with which he declares, “It is up to me now to choose how to live out the months that remain to me”. These are not the words of a man who plans to rage against the dying of the light, he simply plans to confront (as Hume did) the difficulty “to be more detached from life than I am at present.”

We could certainly expect – from his own energetic accounts – Dr. Sacks to plunge aggressively into treatment. He describes himself in the NY Times piece with powerful, vivid words, a “man of vehement disposition, with violent enthusiasms, and extreme immoderation in all (his) passions.” One might presume that such a person, when faced with the prospect of a terminal illness such as Dr. Sacks’, he would opt for Thomas’ strategy. And yet, when given the opportunity to consider his path, he has chosen differently. Dr. Sacks decided to forgo aggressive treatments – choosing the quality of his life over its quantity. His path is not the one less traveled, but rather one recently reflected in the perspectives of healthcare providers and patient alike.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.