Bioethics Blogs

The Center for Practical Bioethics Weighs In on Proposed “Right to Try” Legislation in Kansas

A perspective from John G. Carney’s (President, Center for Practical Bioethics) based on testimony before the House Committee on Health and Human Services (HB 2004, Right to Try)

Most of us would agree that the “Right to Try” legislation proposed in the State of Kansas is appealing in the world of ideas and the realm of rhetoric where personal freedom and the pursuit of limitless aspirations are admirable ideals. But the world of reality bends its merits to questionable decisions that may disrupt the safe delivery of care to the most vulnerable population that healthcare professionals are called to serve.

In bioethics we recognize the deep-seated human impulse to rescue the imperiled, which is what this legislation seeks to do. However, we also grudgingly acknowledge that we could not run our businesses, public and private services or health care systems while indulging this impulse without limits. Furthermore, it is also widely accepted that “spectacle ethics” that turn individual cases into cause célèbre should not dictate public policy – no matter how heart-breaking they are. In the real world, there are good reasons to think that the “Right to Try” legislation should not be pursued despite our natural impulse to rescue.

While the popular framing of this issue characterizes interventions as miraculous and life-saving, there is little to no evidence that the interventions actually result in a good or “hoped for” outcome. We are not bound to provide a treatment that offers no benefit. In fact, it is a violation of our moral duty to do so.

Proponents may argue, if there is some evidence in the first phase of the clinical trial process that the patient may benefit from this treatment, then we should allow them access in the face of their impending death.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.