Bioethics Blogs

Speaking about dignity

Several years ago, while on the verge of delivering the baby of a seventeen year old, I was taken aback by the number of friends that she had asked to accompany her at the event…an event formerly considered far more private than one in which fifteen or so friends might attend (it was a large delivery room). And speaking of private, the wording and location of her tattoo demonstrated further that private areas had lost their former distinction.

The only practical option at that time was to ignore the crowd and attend to the imminent delivery, and ensure the newborn’s and mother’s safety. I could only hope that everyone had the sense to stay out of the way if an emergency arose. There was no time for instructions, explanations, or crowd control.

All turned out well. The teenager delivered a healthy baby, and I stayed on duty on labor and delivery. Our paths never crossed again, but I have thought of that brief encounter many times over the ensuing years.

When I think of the struggle to protect human dignity from innumerable external onslaughts, I think of battles such as those over public policy, technology, and cultural trends. But what I have not seen well is how the struggle extends to the hospital bedside, when the most pressing threat is from the patient herself. How much ought we, as physicians, while comforting and testing and treating and advising, take a firm stand and square off with patients, to explain why they themselves are the biggest threat to their own dignity?

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.