Bioethics Blogs

Amnesia and Other Side Effects of Epidemics

If there is one medical condition that commonly occurs at the culmination of many infectious disease epidemics it is “amnesia.”

That was the message from Howard Markel, M.D., Ph.D., the George E. Wantz Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan. He looked to previous fights against infectious diseases over the last 200 years to help the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) process the many lessons to be learned from the recent Ebola epidemic.

Markel said his fear is that precious little will be learned, or that what has been learned will quickly be forgotten.

“The most common final end to a pandemic is what I call profound amnesia,” he said. “SARS? What’s that? We are not yet at ‘Ebola? What’s that?’ But I guarantee you we will be there. And that’s the real problem.”

The Commission is grappling with the U.S. engagement in the global response to the current Ebola epidemic, and Thursday afternoon it sought insights from historical, sociological, and legal perspectives.

For the recent history of the fight against Ebola, the panel turned to Unni Karunakara, Dr.PH, a Senior Fellow at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. Karunakara was involved in some of the early fights against Ebola during his time with Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders or MSF), where he last served as International President.

Karunakara said the confusion and suspicion that accompanied his early experiences confronting Ebola outbreaks in Africa quickly taught him that there is one thing that will always undermine the effectiveness of the effort.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.