Bioethics Blogs

Can Safety, Freedom And Rationing Co-Exist For The Elderly?

by Susan Mathews, Bioethics Program Alumna (2014)

In a recent op-ed article, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, former Special Advisor for Health Policy to the Obama Administration, stated that he did not want to live beyond the age of 75. At that point, his productive life would be over and he become a burden rather than a benefit to his family, his friends and his country.

Whether or not you agree with Dr. Emanuel’s provocative statement, he raised an important point in his article: in order to contain health care costs, Americans will have to make difficult decisions about rationing of medical care. This is particularly true of end-of-life care for the elderly, which is a significant contributor to medical spending in the United States.

The problem will only become more acute in the coming years. The 65 and over population is projected to grow from 13 percent of the population today to 20 percent by the year 2030. In that same period, the population of the “old-old” (85+) will quadruple as the large baby boomer cohort reaches these advanced ages.

So as explicit rationing of medical care becomes a reality, how can costs be managed while still respecting the rights and safety of the elderly?

To read more, click here.

[This post is a summary of an article published on Life Matters Media on January 16, 2015. The contents of this blog are solely the responsibility of the author and do not represent the views of the Bioethics Program or Union Graduate College.]

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.