Bioethics Blogs

A Cold Day’s Concern About a Warming Planet

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership

My husband and I usually spend both Thanksgiving and Christmas at my in-laws’ house in Western New York, located about 30 minutes outside of Buffalo. This year was no exception.

What was different this year was the unusual weather. The Thanksgiving holiday was a white one, with sub-freezing temperatures and lots of snow on the ground. In fact, at that time the Buffalo area was still recovering from one of the worst storms in recent history, with some areas receiving over 8 feet of lake-effect snow in the two weeks prior.

By contrast, the Christmas holiday was a green one, with temperatures in the mid-fifteens and not a flake of snow to be seen. We did, however, experience high winds that knocked over trees and toppled power lines. My grandfather-in-law was nearly killed when he struck a downed telephone poles while driving home late on Christmas Eve.

It’s tempting to chalk up these weird weather patterns to global climate change. According to the vast majority of climate scientists (over 97% of them, to be precise), we can expect to see increasing temperatures, changing rain and snowfall patterns, and more extreme weather events like droughts, floods and blizzards over the coming years. These changes are the result of increasing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, largely as a result of industrial activity.

Despite concerted campaigns by business groups, right-wing pundits, and conservative politicians to discredit the theory — and despite the fact that much of the US is currently shivering under abnormally cold weather — I do believe that climate change is real.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.