Bioethics Blogs

Ebola and the ethics of research design

A couple of recent articles stimulated my interest on the ethics of conducting ebola research, particularly with those conducted in low-resource settings and having a randomised controlled design. It interested me enough to write a letter to JAMA, where it got bounced.  I thought about submitting to Lancet, but hip replacement surgery got in my way: just too much work. So it goes. Part of what is fascinating about the topic are the underlying issues regarding whether doing anything other than the ‘gold standard’ of clinical trials is justified. I am diverting this piece to Global Bioethics Blog just in case a reader finds something of value in it. 
Two recent commentaries in this journal argue for and against conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of new Ebola drugs during the current epidemic.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.