Bioethics Blogs

An International Agreement on Commercial Surrogacy?

A lively and informative three-day forum convened in The Hague from August 11-13. The International Forum on Intercountry Adoption and Global Surrogacy brought together nearly a hundred scholars, women’s health and human rights advocates, and policymakers from 27 countries at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University, the Forum’s host organization.

The Forum aimed to provide a venue “to discuss ways to improve international standards around the evolving practices of cross-border adoption and surrogacy, in which children typically move from poorer to wealthier countries.”  The Center for Genetics and Society chaired the “Global Surrogacy Practices” thematic area of the conference.

Serendipitously, the Forum occurred in the wake of headlines about two disturbing surrogacy incidents in Thailand. In one case, an Australian couple was accused of abandoning their baby son, who has Down syndrome, with his Thai surrogate mother and returning home with his twin sister (1, 2); the husband was then revealed to have been convicted of multiple child sex offenses that took place between the early 1980s and early 1990s against girls as young as five. In the other news story, a young Japanese businessman fathered sixteen children since June 2013 with Thai surrogate mothers, claiming that he wanted a large family (1, 2).

These incidents took surrogacy out of its usual celebrity-drive spotlight and highlighted the risks of unregulated international surrogacy arrangements for a broader public. For Forum participants, they also underlined concerns about children born as a result of contract pregnancies, and set the stage for discussions of the “best interests of the child,” which is a foundational concept of the 1993 Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption (HCIA).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.