Bioethics Blogs

Moving on from Nicholas Wade to Continuing Concerns about Scientific Racism

Four faces of varying color

The sad saga of Nicholas Wade, former international reporter turned laughing stock, seems to be staggering toward its inevitable end. However, the issues that he — unintentionally — highlighted remain, and badly need to be addressed.

Wade’s fatuous book, A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History (see 1, 2), has drawn what surely must be the definitive response from, at last count, 143 population geneticists. Essentially (to quote Marshall McLuhan, as scripted by Woody Allen) they each say:

You know nothing of my work.

The scientists published a short letter in The New York Times Book Review on August 8, commending the July 10th review of Wade’s book by David Dobbs and thanking Dobbs “for his description of Wade’s misappropriation of research from our field to support arguments about differences among human societies.” The letter notes that:

Wade juxtaposes an incomplete and inaccurate account of our research on human genetic differences with speculation that recent natural selection has led to worldwide differences in I.Q. test results, political institutions and economic development. We reject Wade’s implication that our findings substantiate his guesswork. They do not.

We are in full agreement that there is no support from the field of population genetics for Wade’s conjectures.

The letter was noticed in various corners of the press, including the Los Angeles Times and the [London] Independent, as well as the news pages of Nature and Science. Some of the readers’ comments in Science are a source of grim humor if you are so inclined.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.