Bioethics Blogs

Feelings, Identity, and Reality in Her

Her is an enjoyable, thoughtful and rather sad movie anticipating a possible future for relations between us and our artificially intelligent creations. Director Spike Jonze seems to see that the nature of these relationships depends in part on the qualities of the AIs, but even more on how we understand the shape and meaning of our own lives. WARNING: The following discussion contains some spoilers. It is also based on a single viewing of the film, so I might have missed some things.

Her?

Theodore Twombly (Joaquin Phoenix) lives in an L.A. of the not so distant future: clean, sunny, and full of tall buildings. He works at a company that produces computer-generated handwritten-appearing letters for all occasions, and seems to be quite good at his job as a paid Cyrano. But he is also soon to be divorced, depressed, and emotionally bottled up. His extremely comfortable circumstances give him no pleasure. He purchases a new operating system (OS) for the heavily networked life he seems to lead along with everybody else, and after a few perfunctory questions about his emotional life, which he answers stumblingly, he is introduced to Samantha, a warm and endlessly charming helpmate. It is enough to know that she is voiced by Scarlett Johansson to know how infinitely appealing Samantha is. So of course Theodore falls for her, and she seems to fall for him. Theodore considers her his girlfriend and takes her on dates; “they” begin a sexual relationship. He is happy, a different man. But all does not go well.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.