Bioethics Blogs

A Future of Technology, or a Future for Science?

Just before Thanksgiving, acclaimed physicist, science popularizer, and futurist Michio Kaku had an article in the “Crystal Ball” section of the New York Times Opinion pages on his predictions — as a scientist — for the future. Kaku lists ten putatively great technological developments that we will achieve if only we can just “grasp the importance of science and science education.” But Kaku’s predictions of the future, which are just extrapolations from currently trendy technologies, sells science short in a way that is characteristic of much futurist speculation. From this list, you would get the impression that the “importance of science education” simply means that science will help us design better machines.

Now, I don’t even really think that Kaku himself thinks this; he has written some decent popular science books on theoretical physics, and he is known for his activism on such science-policy issues as climate change and nuclear power, and for promoting such public-science endeavors as SETI. (Even if you do not agree with the positions Kaku takes on these issues, they are instances of science as a source of knowledge, not as merely the basis of technology.) It is clear that Kaku does know that the importance of science extends beyond its engineering applications, but it is almost in the nature of futurist writing to let one’s sense of certainty in the arc of technological progress overcome the curiosity and openness to new and unexpected knowledge characteristic of science. This is certainly the case with transhumanist writing, which tends to assume that better and faster versions of today’s technologies (which represent exponentially accelerating trends, after all) will be what define the future.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.